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Connected Energy powers up recruitment programme

Battery energy storage firm expands its engineering team in Norfolk and creates new jobs in Newcastle.

18/03/2024

A global leader in second life battery energy storage systems is expanding its team as it brings more quality jobs to Norfolk and Newcastle in response to new project wins.

Connected Energy is one of the world’s leading providers of energy storage systems using second life batteries from former electric vehicles (EVs). Repurposing these batteries in stationary systems gives them longer working lives, delivering significant environmental and circular economy benefits. Its E-STOR systems are increasingly used across the UK and Europe for applications such as supporting EV charging hubs, cutting energy bills, balancing the grid, and maximising the return on investment from solar arrays.

The company has ramped up recruitment after being named part of a cutting-edge consortium to explore battery reuse with a major automotive manufacturer, and a contract to supply its systems to one of the world’s leading truck and bus manufacturers. Connected Energy is scaling up as a result, with seven new starters joining its engineering team in Hethel and a further three at its office in Newcastle upon Tyne.

We are delighted to be delivering more quality engineering jobs in Norfolk as we continue to grow our team. These new appointments will enable us to further enhance our position as a global leader in second life energy storage systems.

Matthew Lumsden, CEO, Connected Energy

Matthew added: “As we continue to develop exciting new partnerships, this brings fresh engineering challenges for us to solve. Expanding our teams will enable us to ensure our products can accommodate batteries from multiple manufacturers in a single system while still maintaining the high levels of performance that our clients expect.”

Connected Energy is part of a £30 million collaborative project recently announced by the Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC), supported by grant funding of £15m. The programme focuses on EV battery reuse, recycling and energy balancing. The consortium includes the Nissan Technical Centre Europe (NTCE) in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, battery producer AESC, and Altilium, a UK-based clean technology group focused on supporting the transition to net zero.

This builds on Connected Energy’s successes with Volvo. The companies recently signed a Letter of Intent with the ambition to jointly develop a battery energy storage system (BESS).

Connected Energy’s engineering team is divided into five functions, including product engineering such as understanding and integrating new battery packs. There are hardware and software concept design teams, a supply chain team, installation team and after-sales support team.

The new employees include Uchenna Muo, an electrical design engineer, who is a Nigerian graduate at master’s level with experience in the renewable energy sector. He is joined by Farangis Tabibi, an Iranian electrical design engineer, Matthew Kemp as junior test and assembly engineer, and Karol Bacik, a test and assembly engineer from Poland. Four graduates also join the Hethel team: Michael Omikunle as junior installation engineer, Shrevya Thomas as junior electrical design engineer, Javier Morales Mateo as junior product innovation engineer, and Saravanan Gnanapandithan Thirumurugan as junior mechanical design engineer.

“We are really pleased to be able to continue to attract global talent to fill these roles,” said Matthew. “Engineering is becoming much more diverse and our company continues to reflect this change, with the latest intake including employees from Nigeria, India, Iran and mainland Europe.”

Three new roles have also been added to the Newcastle team, with Sarah Burns as digital marketing manager, Shreya Maliwal as data analyst and Anna Schofield as financial modeller and analyst.

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